Music Theory for Recorder: Counterpoint

Counterpoint discusses the methods used over the centuries, particularly in the Renaissance and Baroque periods, to compose well-balanced polyphonic music. As opposed to the newer theories of Harmony that analyze music as vertical chords and are best adapted to homophony, Counterpoint portrays composition as an interweaving of two or more independent voices, with rules and suggestions on which intervals and types of movement between the various voices provide the most pleasing results. 


It is highly recommended to work your way through this page starting at the top, as each installment builds on the previous one. These videos are just an introduction. If you really get interested in this topic, I suggest signing up for an actual class in Counterpoint at a nearby music school or university.  

Go To

How to Write Counterpoint

YouTube Video: Music Matters

This is a general, relaxed overview of the concept of Counterpoint. He uses British names for the various note shapes.

Species Counterpoint Part 1: Introduction

YouTube Video: Jacob Gran

This is the first video of a series of seven that introduces the basics of Counterpoint. I recommend going over to YouTube and viewing Dr. Jacob Gran's entire series!

How to Compose 1:1 Counterpoint

YouTube Video: Jacob Gran

This series of four videos was chosen because it makes many references to how counterpoint has been used in various periods of Western music. This first video begins with the simplest counterpoint and gradually increases the complexity.

How to Compose 2:1 Counterpoint

YouTube Video: Jacob Gran

The second video in this series.

How to Compose 3:1 Counterpoint

YouTube Video: Jacob Gran

The third video in this series.

How to Compose 4:1 Counterpoint

YouTube Video: Jacob Gran

The fourth video in this series.

 

How to Write a Fugue

YouTube Video: High School Composer

An overview of the fugal composition technique using Bach's Little Fugue in G minor.

Analysis of D Major Fugue from Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier, Book II

YouTube Video: Richard Atkinson

Analysis of C Sharp Fugue from Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier, Book II

YouTube Video: Richard Atkinson